By now you’ve probably heard all about the concept of bi-modal IT, as defined by Gartner. Mode 1 of IT emphasizes stability and reliability, think established productivity and business applications like email and ERP. Mode 2 focuses more on agility and speed, applications that are relatively new and updated frequently. Most purpose-built mobile and web apps fall into this category.

Regardless of what mode an application falls into, or whether your IT department even buys into the whole bi-modal IT concept, chances are you’re looking to run more of your applications in the cloud. You may be motivated by cost savings, freeing up internal IT and personnel resources or just having more flexibility to provision and de-provision applications and servers.

But any time you look to run something in the cloud, whether that’s something that previously ran in house or is being spun up from the start in the cloud, a common conundrum arises: how can you ensure that your application will remain available with fast load and response times when you don’t control the infrastructure supporting it?

Running workloads in the cloud doesn’t mitigate the need for availability and performance monitoring if anything it only complicates it. Traditional server, application, and network metrics become useless once the application and the infrastructure supporting it are in the cloud.

So how can you ensure that your end users are still getting the same consistent experience they previously received when the application was in your data center? How can you make sure cloud service providers are providing the service levels they agreed to provide?

To find out, stay tuned for the next installment of this blog series or download our new ebook, Using Digital Experience Monitoring to Guide Cloud Migrations, to learn more.

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